• It’s Not You, It’s Me

    Eventually, something would have to give. Over the last decade in the wool industry I have slowly watched my home soil perish. The dirt underneath my feet is cracked and thirsty. Paddocks that were once littered with sheep, are now bare. It’s hard to remember a time during my woolclassing career when the drought wasn’t part of the small talk that I make with farmers. A time when we would worry if we would be able to get out that black soil driveway without getting bogged. Those times of laying in the shearers quarters at night listening to the rain on the tin roof. Hearing those two words that were…

  • THE BIG DRY

    (Image – ‘Cambo’, Mungindi NSW) The big dry. There’s a lot of things you can regulate, influence and change as a woolgrower. But the rain ain’t one of them. Working across Southern and Outback Queensland for most of my working year in the woolsheds, I experience the highs and lows of the seasons alongside the woolgrowers who I class for. Some days work is called off because not even my 4wd can navigate their black soil driveways to start work. But when the big dry rears its ugly head, there is nothing but sunshine. That moisture sucking, dry heat sunshine. The ground under the sheep’s hooves is cracked and patiently…

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